Find your hygge in the Twin Cities

You’ve probably heard the word hygge, but aren’t really sure what it means.

The Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul are good places to find hygge — the Scandinavian phrase for coziness found in the ordinary tasks of daily life — on display.

Hygge became hot as all things Nordic became cool. It’s taken on a life of its own much like tiny houses, man buns and flannel shirts.

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Minneapolis’ trendy Askov Finlayson menswear store has a festive atmosphere. (Sheryl Jean)
Nordic roots run deep in Minnesota deep (Nordic Vikings may have visited the state in the 1300s). Many Minnesotans claim Scandinavian heritage. Some Twin Cities Sandinavian shops date to the 1950s. In 1999, chef Marcus Samuelsson opened upscale Swedish-inspired Aquavit  in Minneapolis, but it closed four years later. (I ate there.)

In the last decade or so, Scandinavian culture has surged — along with the popularity of Nordic mystery writers, the Finnish television crime drama Bordertown and bands like Sweden’s First Aid Kit. Danish restaurant Noma was named the world’s best for four of the last 10 years. You’ll find the Minnesota version of New Nordic cuisine, which embraces regional foods and artisanal production, in the Twin Cities.

Hygge is on display at this sampling of spots in Minneapolis and St. Paul:

Food:

Bachelor Farmer, Minneapolis’ trendy North Loop neighborhood: Chef Paul Berglund was named Best Chef Midwest by the James Beard Foundation. Its Swedish-inspired menu includes butterscotch mushroom confit and toasts of duck liver pâté and lamb liver terrine. Owners Eric and Andrew Dayton, sons of Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton, are in the forefront of the Twin Cities’ Nordic resurgence.

Spoon and Sable, Minneapolis’ North Loop:  The restaurant, led by chef Gavin Kaysen (a James Beard Rising Star Chef in 2008) won a coveted Best New Restaurant nominee in 2015. Order white asparagus chowder with smoked lake trout, pork schnitzel or smoked whitefish.

Uptown 43, Minneapolis’ Linden Hills neighborhood: Chef/owner Erick Harcey’s late Swedish grandfather provided the inspiration for the restaurant. Harcey puts a twist on family recipes: salmon gravlax smörgås; Pyttipanna (Swedish hash) with cottage cheese and fried eggs; and Swedish meatball sandwich with lingonberry, charred cucumbers and fried onion.

The Finnish Bistro, St. Anthony Park: This small spot has a big menu. Try the Finnish oatcakes for breakfast, reindeer sausage and potato quiche for lunch and traditional Finnish beef pasty or stuffed cabbage rolls for dinner.

Shops:

Askov Finlayson, Minneapolis’ North Loop: The trendy shop, named for two northern Minnesota towns, sells some Nordic menswear and accessories. Eric and Andrew Dayton are the owners. It sells clothing emblazoned with “North,” a label created by the brothers to highlight Minnesota’s ruggedness, hygge and coolness that’s taken off. Hip eyeglass outlet Warby Parker occupies the rear corner.

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Fjallraven opened its St. Paul, Minn., store in fall 2015. (Sheryl Jean)
Fjällräven, St. Paul, Uptown Minneapolis, Mall of America: The Swedish outerwear retailer is probably best known in the U.S. for its square backpacks, but it offers much more. Fjallraven blends function with design, bold colors and quality fabrics. The St. Paul store is the newest of three in the Twin Cities. (Photos at top and at right.)

The Foundry Home Goods, Minneapolis’ North Loop: The warm, bright shop oozes hygge. It sells Swedish soap and bath accessories, Nordic wooden products, but also products from Canada and Japan.

Ingebretsen’s Scandinavian Gifts, Minneapolis: Beyond selling Nordic items, it offers classes from cooking to traditional crafts and even making a troll mask.

Sandeen’s Scandinavian Gifts, Art & Needlecraft, St. Paul: Dating to the mid-1950s, this shop sells items such as imported crystal, trolls, ceramics, table linens, cookware, jewelry, Swedish Dala Horses and Rosemåling (traditional folk art) supplies.

Want to learn more about visiting the Twin Cities? Read this article I just wrote for The Dallas Morning News.

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