What will battle about Taiwan name mean for U.S. airlines, passengers?

Flying just became more political for some U.S. airlines.

China’s aviation regulator recently said U.S. airlines missed a deadline to stop referring to Taiwan as a separate entity on their websites.

American Airlines screen shot 7-28-18
This screen shot from American Airlines’ website shows the airport options that appear for a search for Taiwan.

Although American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines removed references to Taiwan on their websites on the July 25 deadline, the Civil Aviation Administration of China said their actions were “incomplete,” according to the Financial Times.

It’s unclear what will happen next — and if it will affect U.S. airlines and their passengers.

Other global airlines, including British Airways and Lufthansa, have shifted to using “Taiwan, China” on their websites.

Lufthansa screen shot 7-28-18
Lufthansa is now using “Taiwan, China” as seen on this screen shot from its website.

In April, China demanded that dozens of global airlines change how they refer to Taiwan by July 25 or risk sanctions.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders has¬†called China’s actions “Orwellian nonsense. In a May statement, she said China’s demand was “part of a growing trend by the Chinese Communist Party to impose its political views on American citizens and private companies.”

Since 1949, China and Taiwan have been governed separately after the Communist victory in a Chinese civil war. The People’s Republic of China, however,¬†claims Taiwan as part of its territory under its “One China Principle.”