Business or pleasure? Travel trends for 2019

Do you plan to travel more or less this year?

Your answer may depend on whether you travel for business or pleasure.

Regardless, both types of travel within the United States are projected to slow in the first half of this year after 2018’s growth outpaced 2017.

Total U.S. travel is expected to grow 2.4 percent through June, compared with growth of 3.6 percent in December, according to the U.S. Travel Association.

Why? A slowing global economy and volatile financial markets present the biggest risks to the short-term travel outlook, said Adam Sacks, president of research firm Oxford Economics’ tourism economics group. Oxford conducted this research for the USTA.

It’s just business

Most growth over the next six months will come from domestic travel (projected to grow 2.6 percent) vs. international travel (projected to increase to 2 percent). And most of that domestic travel growth  will come from the business side (+3.4 percent). Leisure travel is expected to grow about 2.2 percent.

That continues a trend from last year, when business travel within in the United States saw its best year since 2010, according to the USTA.

Let’s play

Still, certain segments of the domestic leisure market will get more attention than others.

Here are some leisure travel trends from a recent study by the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA), Outside magazine and East Carolina University:

  • Adventure travelers seek novel experiences, embrace challenges and want to have a positive impact on the places they go.
  • Personal wellness as a travel experience will continue. This may include yoga retreats, “digital detoxes” and nature immersion.
  • International travel will continue to surge, helped by fast and easy digital research and booking. International tourist arrivals rose 6 percent to 1.4 billion in 2018 from 2017, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organization.
  • Expect more global destinations to launch measures to combat overtourism. In the last couple of years, places including Italy’s Cinque Terre and Peru’s Machu Picchu, began limiting visitors, offering safety education, asking visitors to sign tourism pledges and implementing taxes or fines to protect their landmarks, support local infrastructure needs and encourage better visitor behavior.

Read other blog posts I’ve written about travel trends.