In Europe, St. Nicholas comes before Santa Claus

Who is the man with a long white beard in December?

In many countries, there are two answers to that question.

Santa Claus delivers gifts at Christmas on Dec. 25.

Before that, people in many countries in Europe — from Belgium to Russia — celebrate St. Nicholas Day. It’s Dec. 6 in some western European countries, such as Belgium and Germany, and Dec. 19 in Eastern European countries, like Ukraine.

Many people in those countries celebrate both St. Nicholas Day and Christmas.

Unlike Santa, St. Nicholas was a real person born in the third century in what’s now Turkey. He was a bishop who became a Christian saint in the late 10th century.

In Germany, St. Nicholas Day isn’t a public holiday, but it’s celebrated widely with cheer. On the eve of St. Nicholas Day, or Nikolaustag, which is tonight (Dec. 5), children in Germany put out their boots or hang stockings outside their door. On the morning of Dec. 6, children (who have been good) wake to find their boots or stockings filled with chocolate, cookies, nuts or even small gifts like a scarf.

German shops sell candy like these of St. Nicholas chocolates in Berlin. (Sheryl Jean)

St. Nicholas Day has a dark side. A folkloric helper called Knecht Ruprecht in Germany or Krampus in some Central European countries often accompanies St. Nicholas to punish naughty children.

The half-goat, half-demon creature usually is portrayed as dark and hairy with horns, cloven hooves and a long, pointed tongue.  You can see why this pagan mythological figure inspired a yuletide horror movie called “Krampus” in 2015.

In comparison, St. Nicholas often is portrayed as an elderly, benevolent soul in Western Europe, with a long, white beard, wearing a bishop’s mitre (a tall headdress) and holding a hooked staff.

Statue of St. Nicholas
This statue of St. Nicholas is how he often is portrayed in Western Europe. (dassel via Pixabay)

Note: The featured photo at top is by Ben Kerckx via Pixabay.

5 tips to free up room in your luggage for holiday travel

It’s that time of year again, when we travel far distances to be with family and friends for the holidays.

Whether you’re flying or driving, space is at a premium. Packing light is a priority.

Here are five tips on what not to pack and how to better pack what’s necessary:

1. Leave your toiletries at home. Whether you’re in a hotel, AirBnB or a relative’s house, chances are they’ll provide shampoo. If you can do without your favorite brands for a few days, leave behind your soap, shampoo, conditioner, lotion and other common toiletries. You also can buy them at your destination. If you must have a certain brands, carry the travel sizes. That will not only save room in your checked bags but it meets TSA regulations for carry-on bags. Also pack smaller sizes of other items, such as a hairbrush.

If you must pack toiletries, bring the item on the left, which is smaller than 3.4 ounces. (Sheryl Jean)

2. Think like a European. Do you really need six complete changes of clothes and five pairs of shoes for a four-day trip? Recycle your clothing. That’s what Europeans do. Pack color coordinates items to mix and match pieces of clothing. Your relatives may not even notice you wore the same blues two days ago if it’s underneath a sweater.

3. Roll, don’t fold. You’ll save room your luggage by rolling your clothing instead of folding them flat. That method also reduces wrinkles and makes it easier to see what’s in your bag. I was rolling long before Marie Kondo recommended it.

This is how I roll my clothes before placing them in a bag. (Sheryl Jean)

4. Pack for the weather. Check the weather forecast for your destination before you pack. If there’s no chance of rain, don’t pack an umbrella and raincoat. If it’s supposed to snow, replace high heels with boots and wear them on the plane. Always wear your heaviest items when flying to free up more room in and reduce the weight of your luggage.

5. Don’t duplicate. If you have an e-reader, do you need to bring books? If you have a smartphone, do you need a travel alarm clock? Do you need both a tablet and a laptop? Pick technology or go Old School, but not both, and don’t duplicate your technology.

Note: The featured photo at top is from took a pic via Pixabay.

Warm up at these 7 Boise, Idaho, craft breweries

Boise brewery

Whether you’re planning to ski or visit family, winter provides an opportunity to warm up with some craft beer. And Idaho is the perfect place to do so.

Idaho’s brewery scene has seen heady growth over the last few years. Boise, the state capital and Idaho’s largest city, and the surrounding area are home to more than 20 breweries.

While Boise is known for Northwest IPAs made from hops grown in Oregon and Washington, local brewers like to experiment with new styles and flavors, so there promises to be something for everyone. On two recent visits, I found citrus-infused ales, chocolaty stouts and interesting flavor profiles using Hibiscus, Vanilla and tea.

Here are seven craft breweries I visited and liked, but there are many more to try:

Boise Brewing, 521 West Broad St., Boise

Founder Collin Rudeen sources ingredients sourced from local farmers. Its November beer list included 15 choices – from Golden Trout Pale Ale to Black Cliffs (Stout) to cider. Boise Brewing has received four medals from the Great American Beer Fest and Black Cliffs one a gold medal at the 2018 World Beer Cup.

Visitors will see large ceramic mugs lining the walls of the downtown Boise taproom. They belong to Idaho residents who are part owners of the brewery. I like that it’s one of a handful of community-owned breweries across the country.  In fact, 6-year-old Boise Brewery is in the midst of a third Idaho Public Offering to raise capital to make improvements to its downtown Boise taproom and possibly open a second taproom.

Boise Brewing collage
Boise Brewing manages to feel cozy even thought its inside a large warehouse. (Sheryl Jean and BeFunky)

Mad Swede Brewing Co., 2772 South Cole Road, #140, Boise

Owners Jerry and Susie Larson spent 30 years home-brewing and experimenting before deciding to open the brewery in 2016. Its early November tap list of 14 options includes Lollygagger Lager, Naked Sunbather Nut Brown Ale (winner of a 2018 silver medal from the North American Brewers Association) and Sunstone Hazy IPA (New England style). Located near the Boise Airport, the taproom has a laid-back vibe and features live music, trivia nights, games and Comedy Open Mic Nights on Mondays. You can order from a food truck.

Woodland Empire Ale Craft, 1114 West Front St., Boise

Is there a better combination than beer and pinball? That’s what you’ll find at Woodland Empire, which specializes in IPAs with its “Mixtape Series” and twists on classic styles like its current Thunder Chicken (smoked Porter) and Count Chocula (chocolate cereal milk Stout). Its Mixtape offering in November was Twined & Twisted (Kristall Haze IPA). Former Austin, Texas, musician and homebrewer Keely Landerman, her husband Rob, and Tom Dolan started making artisan beers in small batches in 2014. They started amassing medals in 2015: winning five medals through 2018. At the downtown Boise taproom, you can play on retro pinball machines order tasty food from Manfred’s Kitchen next door for delivery to your table.

Woodland Empire Craft Ale
Sip your beer while playing retro games at Woodland Empire Ale Craft. (Sheryl Jean)

Payette Brewing Co., 733 South Pioneer St., Boise

Founder Mike Francis left his Boeing engineering job to study brewing at Chicago’s Siebel Institute of Technology. He first worked at Seattle’s Schooner Exact Brewing before opening Payette Brewing in 2010. He named the brewery for French Canadian fur trader François Payette, whose moniker graces many Idaho landmarks. It offers many year-round and seasonal brews, such as Flyline Vienna Lager, Pistolero Porter and Sofa King Juicy Mango Hazy IPA. Its all-ages taproom allows well-behaved pets. Customers can order from rotating food trucks and take a free brewery tour on Saturdays.

Boise
Payette Brewing is located in an office/industrial area along the Boise River. (Sheryl Jean and BeFunky)

Barbarian Brewing, 5270 Chinden Boulevard, Garden City, and 1022 West Main St., Boise

Husband-and-wife team James Long and BreAnne Hovley started the brewery in the Boise suburb of Garden City with help from Kickstarter in 2015, Two years later, they opened a second taproom in downtown Boise, which draws a hip, youngish crowd. You won’t find its beers outside of the two taprooms, which adds to the allure. Using Old World-brewing styles, the brewery specializes in limited batch sours, Bourbon barrel stouts and barley wines, but it also makes traditional beers, Belgian ales and experimental styles such as Ice Cream Ales and a Candy Gose series. Boise customers can order food for delivery from Calle 75 Street Tacos. You won’t find this beer outside of its taprooms.

Boise

Barbarian Brewing has an extensive selection of brews. (Sheryl Jean and BeFunky)

10 Barrel Brewing, 830 West Bannock St., Boise

Technically, this is a brewpub opened in 2013 by the Bend, Ore.-based brewery, but Boise brewmaster Shawn Kelso (aka Big Daddy) does make beer on site. Its known for big IPAs – like Idahop and Freak Alley – but its menu of 22 beers on top in early November also includes Swill (American Radler), Apricot Crush (Sour), Cream Ale and the seasonal Pray for Snow (Winter Ale). The open, industrial-style brewpub is a popular spot to watch sports on big-screen televisions. 10 Barrel Brewing operates five other locations in California, Colorado and Oregon.

Boise
10 Barrel Brewing in downtown Boise is part brewpub and part sports bar. The bar is open to the sidewalk during nice weather. (Sheryl Jean)

Sockeye Brewing, 12542 West Fairview Ave., Boise, and 3019 North Cole Road, Boise.

Sockeye is Boise’s largest brewery. Founded in 1996, it now has two Boise locations with full-service restaurants. Along with its flagship Dagger Falls IPA, you’ll find Woolybugger Wheat, Angel’s Peach Amber and seasonal brews like Winterfest. This award-winning brewery doesn’t take itself too seriously with its motto “Drink like a fish!”

Portland, Maine, knows how to celebrate Christmas

The quintessential New England coastal town of Portland, Maine, really comes alive for the winter holidays.

Many special Christmas decorations and festivities dress up Portland’s historic buildings and cobblestone streets. It all creates a cozy atmosphere to warm up visitors on even the coldest days.

Many of Portland’s annual traditions include lights, such as the Monument Square tree lighting in the heart of downtown. It will take place from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Nov. 29. It also features live music and Santa Claus.

Also from Monument Square, the city offers free horse-drawn carriage rides through downtown on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from Nov. 29 through Dec. 22.

You can’t miss the Harbor Christmas Boat Parade of Lights in Portland Harbor on Dec. 14. You can watch the festivities from Fort Allen Park or elsewhere along the Portland waterfront as decorated boats sail by. You also can be amid the boats, with a specialty cruise with Casco Bay Lines for $12.50.

Portland Maine
Portland’s Longfellow Square, which is home to the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Monument, is lit up with holiday lights all winter. (Sheryl Jean)

In addition, much of downtown is lit up all winter. Stroll along the bustling streets and vote for your favorite window display as part of the city’s Holiday Window Display Contest from Nov. 29 through Dec. 25.

On Shop for a Cause Day on Nov. 30 – the day after Black Friday — purchases made at participating outlets will benefit a local charity. On Dec. 5, stores participating in Merry Madness will remain open until 10 p.m. for holiday shopping.

Visitors who tour the Wadsworth Longfellow House this holiday season will learn about the friendship between poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Charles Dickens, author of A Christmas Carol. Dickens reportedly performed a public reading of his holiday ghost story at Portland City Hall in 1868. The Maine Historical Society will offer tours of the house where Longfellow grew up on Dec. 16-23.

During Christmas at Victoria Mansion, its 19th-century interior is filled with decorations from local artists, designers and florists over six weeks from Dec. 22 to Jan. 5, 2020. Visitors can take a tour or attend one of several holiday programs and events. Built in the mid-1800s, the mansion boasted hot and cold running water, flush toilets, central heat, gas lights, wall-to-wall carpeting and a 25-foot long stained-glass skylight. Admission prices vary.

Holiday not required

There’s more to Portland than Christmas. Dating to 1632, the city was once Maine’s capital. Its compact size makes it easy to walk to museums, performing arts, quaint shops and plenty of good restaurants, cafes and craft breweries any time of year.

Maine
It’s easy to walk around Portland’s compact downtown, which is rich with historical buildings and colonial architecture. (Sheryl Jean)

Many of those sights are downtown or in the Old Port District, which also offers beautiful water views. The Arts District west of downtown is home to the Portland Museum of Art (designed by I.M. Pei, its collection includes works by Monet, Renoir and Winslow Homer) and the free downtown Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art. Here is where you’ll also find Portland Stage and the State Theatre.

Maine has more than 100 craft breweries, and more than a few call Portland home. There’s Allagash Brewing Co., Liquid Riot Bottling Co., Rising Tide Brewing Co. and Shipyard Brewing Co. to name a few. Don’t want to drink and drive? Hop on The Maine Brew Bus to tour some of the local watering holes.

Portland, Maine
Family owned Shipyard Brewing Co. offers 20 beers and soda at its Portland taproom and brewery. (Sheryl Jean)

Note: The featured photo at top is by Kristel Hayes on Unsplash.

Welcome back: The Point Reyes Lighthouse in Northern California reopens

California Journal

The historic Point Reyes Lighthouse in Northern California reopens today to the public after being closed for 15 months for restoration.

Jutting 10 miles into the Pacific Ocean, the oft fog-enshrouded lighthouse starred in 1980 cult-classic movie The Fog. Decommissioned in 1975, the lighthouse contains the nation’s only brass clockwork mechanism and first-order Fresnel lens in their original place.

In addition to the 148-year-old lighthouse, the visitor center, observation deck and other areas also will be open, according to the National Park Service. In August 2018, I wrote about the temporary closing of the lighthouse.

The $5 million restoration project began on Aug. 6 and was scheduled to be completed this October, but was delayed. Cicely Muldoon, superintendent of Point Reyes National Seashore, said in a July 2018 news release that the lighthouse was “showing its age” and “long-deferred maintenance” needed to be undertaken.

Restoration included new concrete walkways, restoration and replacement of the 1,032 crystal pieces that comprise the Fresnel lens and updating indoor and outdoor exhibit panels.

Credit of featured photograph at top: Rshao via Wikimedia Commons

Everything you need to know about travel to California amid the Getty and Kincade wildfires

Travel to parts of California is returning to normal schedules as firefighters have been able to better contain wildfires in the northern and southern parts of the state.

Last weekend, Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a statewide emergency as high winds fueled wildfires across parts of California.

Now, both the Kincade wildfire in the North and the Getty wildfire in the South are more than 60 percent contained. Evacuees are returning home in some areas and power is being restored in many neighborhoods in both areas.

Northern California

The Charles M. Schultz-Sonoma County Airport (STS) in Santa Rosa said it’s restoring full commercial air service, but it will take a few days to return to normal schedules. The airport had shut down all commercial air services due to the Kincade Fire, which started on Oct. 23 near Geyserville in Sonoma County.

Map of Kincade Fire 2019
This is a map of the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County as of Oct. 28, 2019. (Courtesy of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection)

As of today, the Kincade Fire was 68 percent contained and is expected to be fully contained by Nov. 7, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The fire has burned more than 77,000 acres.

Today, the Santa Rosa airport said it’s restoring full commercial air service, but it will take a few days to return to normal schedules. American Airlines, Sun Country Airlines and United Airlines have resumed normal flight schedules to and from that airport, but Alaska Airlines said on its blog that it has suspended all its 18 daily flights in and out of Santa Rosa through Saturday, Nov. 2, because the situation in Sonoma County remains “dangerous and unpredictable.”

“Everyone’s safety remains the top concern,” Alaska said on its blog. The airline is letting customers change or cancel their flights without fees.

For the Santa Rosa airport, American Airlines is letting customers reschedule flights without fees; Alaska Airlines, Sun Country Airlines and United Airlines are letting passengers change or cancel flights without fees. Certain dates apply for each airline.

Flights in and out of other Northern California airports in Oakland, Sacramento and San Francisco were not directly affected.

Southern California

The Getty Fire in Los Angeles, which was reported on Oct. 28, is 66 percent contained, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department. It has burned about 745 acres.

American Airlines is letting travelers rebook flights without fees for five Southern California airports in Burbank (BUR), Long Beach (LGB), Los Angeles (LAX), Ontario (ONT) and Santa Ana/Orange County (SNA). Delta Air Lines is letting passengers change or cancel flights through the same five  airports without penalty and Sun Country Airlines is doing the same to/from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Certain dates apply for each airline.

The Getty Fire or smoke from it has not affected other airline operations at Southern California airports.

Airline and traveler aid

Some airlines are directly helping California communities affected by the wildfires — and opening avenues for customers to do the same.

American has activated its Disaster Giving program through a partnership with the American Red Cross, which would supply shelter, food, supplies and health services as needed. American’s AAdvantage members wanting to help can give money, earning 10 miles for every dollar donated to the Red Cross with a minimum $25 donation through Nov. 16.

Alaska donated $10,000 to the California Fire Foundation’s SAVE (Supplying Aid to Victims of Emergency) and $5,000 to the Latino Community Foundation’s Wildfire Relief Fund. And the airline will match up to 1 million Mileage Plan miles donated by its customers to its Disaster Relief Pool.

Travelers can register with their airline for text or email notifications of flight delays or cancellations. They also should check with their airline for more details or information about service in California.

6 questions to help you plan a top-flight visit to Northern California wine country

Autumn in California means wine harvest and the release of previous year’s new vintages.

Wonderful weather also means it’s a great time to visit the northern part of the state for wine tastings and vineyard tours.

Newbies and dedicated wine lovers will find long lists of wineries to visit, so I won’t duplicate that here.

When choosing where you want to visit, ask yourself these questions:

  • What type of wine do you want to taste? Red, white, rose or sparkling wine. Some wineries also offer port wine or other spirits made by affiliates.
  • Do you have a particular wine region you want to explore? Northern California alone has several, including dozens of designated appellations, in Alexander Valley, Napa Valley and Russian River Valley in Lake, Napa, Sonoma and other counties. I wrote an article on one of the region’s newest wine appellations, the Petaluma Gap, in April for The Dallas Morning News.
  • Do you want to visit a winery at its vineyard or a tasting room? Many wineries offer tastings and tours of their vineyards on site. Others only have tasting rooms, which also can be at the vineyard or in a town. The town of Healdsburg, which is about 70 miles north of San Francisco, boasts more than two dozen winery tasting rooms, including Hartford Family Winery, La Crema, Seghesio and Portalupi Wines. Tastings and tours can range from $10 to over $100. (See the last bullet item.) During fall harvest, you may be enveloped by the heady aroma of grapes at vineyards.

Joe and Margaret Valenzuela outsource much of the work for their young Rubia Wines label, including their wine aging in barrels at their winemaker Julien Fayard’s property in Napa. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

  • Do you want to visit a large or small winery? A new label or a well-established brand? Family owned? Napa Valley alone has more than 500 wineries. In July, I wrote an article about how a Texas couple started a boutique Rubia Wines in Napa Valley. Its tasting room is at the industrial park office of its winemaker. It offers small bites with tastings. I also wrote an article last year about Hall Wines in Napa Valley, which offers tours and tastings (from $30 to $250 a person) at three locations: vineyards in St. Helena and Rutherford in Napa Valley and a tasting room in the nearby historic town of Sonoma.

Visitors to Hall Wines in St. Helena, Calif., enjoy the view of the Mayacamas Mountains from one of the outdoor seating areas. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

  • Do you want to eat as you taste wine? Nowadays, a winery experience is almost as much about food pairings as it is wine. Some tastings come with small bites or palate cleansers, but more often a winery will charge extra for a “culinary experience” that’s often with fruit and vegetables grown on site and noshes or meals prepared by a well-known chef. That also drives up the cost of a visit, usually starting around $35 and rising into triple figures. Some wineries also feature restaurants where you can order a la carte from a limited menu.
  • Do you want a winery visit with a touch of the unusual At Hall Wines, for example, visitors can wander through 38 large pieces of artwork. At the Francis Ford Coppola Winery in Geyserville, you can reserve a spot at its large pool, which quite the scene when weather permits. Several wineries, including Schramsberg Vineyards in Calistoga and Bella Vineyards in Healdsburg, boast historic caves that visitors can tour. You can play a game of croquet at Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards in Windsor.
This 35-foot-long, stainless-steel leaping rabbit by artist Lawrence Argent greets visitors as they enter Hall Wines’ showcase winery in Napa Valley. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

Wanna fly cheap? It’s not impossible

As the travel season prepares to heat up, people may wonder what kind of prices await them.

Don’t fret. The global airline market remains competitive, especially if you’re willing to book early, fly at off-peak times and try one of the many young low-cost carriers out there.

Europe always has much cheaper flights, and that’s still true despite the demise earlier this year of  Icelandic budget darling Wow Air. International carriers, including England’s EasyJet, Hungary’s Wizz Air and Ireland’s RyanAir offer cheap international flights, including from the United States.

Not all budget airlines are startups. Several large, international airlines also operate budget brands to compete with their low-cost peers. Australia’s JetStar is a subsidiary of Qantas Airways, Australia’s Tigerair is a unit of Virgin Australia, Spain’s Level Airline is part of Iberia Airway and Spain’s Vueling Airlines is a sister company to British Airways.

Level Airline
Some European low cost-carriers, such as Spain’s Level Airline, shuttle passengers to their plans on the tarmac. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

There are low-cost U.S. options, too. Condor Airlines, a German carrier, flies to 10 U.S. cities and many international destinations, Minnesota-based Sun Country Airlines started as a vacation charter, but now offers scheduled passenger service to over 50 destinations in the United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

Critics say budget carriers nickle and dime consumers, have poor on-time records and don’t offer the same service or quality. But there increasingly is little difference between the big and small airlines besides price — unless you’re flying business or first class.

It comes down to what what you are willing to pay vs. what you are willing to put up with within your schedule. Your destination also makes a difference.

I can’t complain about recent cheap, economy-class flights I took on Level, JetStar and TigerAir. One airline was delayed and one had narrow,, basic seats. On the other hand, I thought the food was rather good.

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Spanish low-cost carrier, Level Airline, provided seat-back entertainment systems and a USB charger on a transatlantic flight I flew nearly a year ago. Its movie selection impressed me. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

Follow these tips to help find affordable airfare no matter what type of airline you fly:

  • Book your tickets on a Tuesday or Wednesday, the cheapest days of the week to fly. An average fare on a Tuesday will cost nearly $85 less than Sunday, which is the most expensive day to travel, according to the CheapAir.com 2019 Annual Airfare Study.
  • Last year, the “best day” to book a flight within the continental United States was 76 days — or 2.5 months — in advance, according to CheapAir, which analyzed 917 million airfares. That falls in the middle of what it calls the “prime booking window” — four months to three weeks before your departure date, when fares are at their lowest.
  • Don’t wait until 20 days or less before your target departure. That’s when your chances of getting a bargain or an aisle seat are the worst.
  • Typically, flights during the winter (excluding around the holidays) tend to be less expensive than in summer. It’s simple supply and demand.
  • Based on that premise, flying to Iceland or Germany in winter will probably cost less than going to a warmer climate.

Note: I took the featured photo of Tigerair at top.

5 ways to make college tours more fun

Some people view college tours as a chore — an obligatory part of sending a child into adulthood — but they don’t have to be.

Here are five things to do to make them more fun — during the heat of summer or any time of year.

This is an update to a blog post I wrote last year, after visiting five California universities with my niece. This post focuses on my observations from five recent university tours (in Colorado, Idaho and Washington) with my nephew.

1. Local food: Some universities, especially land grant schools with large agricultural programs, may offer products made on campus and/or made with ingredients grown by students. A visit to Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., is not complete without a stop at Ferdinand’s Ice Cream Shoppe on campus. Ice cream flavors, including Caramel Cashew, Huckleberry Twist and Cougar Tracks, are made with campus products.

This single-serving bowl of two flavors — Huckleberry Twist and Caramel Cashew — cost $2.20 at Ferdinand’s. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

Ferdinand’s also sells WSU’s cheese in a can, with the most popular being Cougar Gold. That stemmed from WSU research in the 1940s to find a way to store cheese in tins. At least 10 years later, the creamery began making milk and ice cream products for students. Today, Ferdinand’s is open to the public.

Off college campuses, try regional products at restaurants, such as a lentil burger (Paradise Creek Brewery) in Pullman, Wash., or dried garbanzo beans (Nectar and Lodgepole) in Moscow, Idaho (home of the University of Idaho). Lentils and garbanzos are grown in the surrounding beautiful Palouse area.

2. Local activities: Find out what a town or area is known for and do it. Look for activities that interest you. Is there a bicycle trail, such as the Bill Chipman Palouse Trail between the University of Idaho in Moscow and Washington State University in Pullman, a climbing wall or community theater? Research can be done beforehand or on the fly via an Internet search, a stop at the local visitor center or asking a local.

Cyclists ride by golden fields of wheat on the 8-mile (one way) Bill Chipman Palouse Trail between Moscow, Idaho, and Pullman, Wash. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

3. Bookstores: College towns still have quirky brick-and-mortar bookstores. Boulder, Colo., has at least a half dozen. Not only are they cool places to hang out, but they usually have a local or regional section to learn about the area and culture or find local authors.

Don’t forget to check out campus bookstores, too. Some schools include a coupon in their information packet (it was 20% off at the University of Idaho and Washington State University). It might be a good opportunity to load up on gear from your favorite school or sports team. They also have a good selection of new books, including books by their professors.

4. Museums: Still on my list from last year is to find campus museums, a trend in recent decades helped by alumni funding. When I recently visited Washington State University’s small and manageable Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, it offered engaging works by Louise Bourgeois, Jacob Lawrence and Robert Rauschenberg. In Golden, Colo., the Colorado School of Mines’ Geology Museum is a find for gem and rock lovers; it has two moon rocks. The University of Colorado Boulder has the Museum of Natural History and the University of Oregon in Eugene, Ore., has the Museum of Natural and Cultural History.

These are just some of the minerals, gems and fossils displayed at the Geology Museum at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colo. (Photo by Sheryl Jean)

5. Explore the town or city. Some college campuses dominate their small host towns, others are located in or near big cities, such as Boston or Seattle. Take the time to walk, bicycle or drive around the town or city closest to campus to see what it has to offer. Eat, shop or watch a movie. Stay overnight if you can to get a true cultural immersion.

Here’s a related tweet from Wednesday, Aug. 7, about five college trends I’ve noticed while on 10 university tours in four states in the last year:

The featured photo at top by me is art by Louise Bourgeois at Washington State University’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

Opening soon: SFO Airport’s new Harvey Milk Terminal 1 will achieve some firsts

When the new Harvey Milk Terminal 1 at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) opens on July 23, its claim to fame will be that it’s the world’s first airport terminal named for an LGBTQ leader.

Quote box for SFO Community Day
(Sheryl Jean with Quozio)

Milk became California’s first openly gay elected official — to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977. Fellow city supervisor Dan assassinated Milk and Mayor George Moscone on Nov. 27, 1978.

A temporary exhibit — a 400-foot wall chronicling Milk’s life called “Harvey Milk: Messenger of Hope” — will greet visitors to the new terminal. A longer-term exhibit featuring 40 historic images of Milk will open in March 2020, when the second phase of the terminal is slated to open.

You can get a free sneak peek of the new terminal (see box above), but you must register for a time-specific ticket.

SFO Grand Hyatt
The AirTrain will link travelers from the new Harvey Milk Terminal 1 to the San Francisco International Airport’s first on-site hotel — the four-star, 351-room Grand Hyatt at SFO — when it opens. (Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport)

The terminal will feature the airport’s first on-site hotel — the four-star, 351-room Grand Hyatt at SFO — though it won’t open until the fall. The hotel, which is taking reservations for Oct. 1 and beyond, also will offer microstays at day-use rates for travelers with long daytime layovers or those who need a nap or shower.

SFO will be the first U.S. airport to use a new tote-based system called Independent Carrier System (ICS) to handle checked baggage in the new terminal. A bag is placed in a container at check-in and remains in the same bin through security screening to loading, with tracking along the way.

The $2.4 billion terminal is the first phase of the redevelopment of one of SFO’s oldest terminals, dating to the 1960s. Terminal 1 has nine of the 25 gates planned when the entire project is expected to be finished in 2022.

Here are some other interesting features the new terminal will offer:

  • A yoga room (see photo below)
  • A Kids Spot interactive play area
  • A gender-neutral restroom and a pet restroom (after security screening).
  • Technology: Free hi-speed Wi-Fi and hundreds of power outlets
  • Art: Look for 30 pieces of art, ranging from a sculpture by Mark Handford, mosaics by Jason Jägel and Robert Minervini, and installations by Leonardo Drew and Liz Glynn.
  • Retail: There will be six new food and beverage concessions: Amy’s Drive Thru, Bourbon Pub, Bun Mee, Little Chihuahua and Starbird (all regional) as well as Illy Caffé. Three retail outlets will be iStore, Mills Cargo and Skyline News.
  • Sustainability: Roof-top solar panels will provide renewable power and many of the terminal’s features save energy, such as elevators that recycle energy, radiant heating and cooling, dimmable lights and windows that tint based on the light condition.
SFO Yoga Room
The new terminal will feature a yoga room for travelers to stretch and destress. (Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport)

The featured photo at top is of SFO’s air traffic control tower lit in rainbow colors for Pride Week. (Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport)